Tag Archives: Martin Scorsese

His Master’s Voice | Emmanuel Lubezki

emannuel-lubezki

 

Emmanuel Lubezki Morgenstern, A.S.C., A.M.C. (1964 – present)

He sometimes goes by the nickname Chivo, which means “goat” in Spanish

Mexican Cinematographer

Lubezki has worked with many acclaimed directors, including Mike Nichols, Martin Scorsese, Michael Mann, Joel and Ethan Coen, and frequent collaborators Terrence Malick, Alfonso Cuarón, and Alejandro González Iñárritu.

Lubezki is known for achieving many groundbreaking cinematography techniques, and his work has been praised by audiences and critics alike, earning him multiple awards, including eight Academy Award nominations for Best Cinematography. He won in this category three times, becoming the first person to do so in three consecutive years, Gravity (2013), Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014), and The Revenant (2015).

Films of Note:  Sólo Con Tu Pareja (1991), Como agua para chocolate (1992), A Little Princess (1995), The Birdcage (1996), Meet Joe Black (1998), Great Expectations (1998), Sleepy Hollow (1999), Y Tu Mamá También (2001), Ali (2001), Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004), The New World (2005), Children of Men (2006), The Tree of Life (2011), Gravity (2013), Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014), The Revenant (2015)

 

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Friday Fun Fact | Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese)

The-Wolf-Of-Wall-Street

Ridley Scott was initially asked to direct this movie, but when he declined, Martin Scorsese came on board. It had a huge impact on the way the movie turned out, naturally. The majority of the film was improvised, as Scorsese often encourages. Wanting to work with his dream director, Jonah Hill demanded a chance to audition, won the role, and took a pay cut by being paid the Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) minimum, which was $60,000.

Scorsese claimed that the sequence of Jordan (Leonardo DiCaprio) attempting to get in his car while extremely impaired on Lemmons was improvised on the day of filming, and that it was DiCaprio’s idea to open the car door with his foot. DiCaprio strained his back during the scene, and was only able to perform the stunt once. DiCaprio cited Caligula (1979) as an inspiration for the way he wanted the excess and decadence depicted in the film.

Matthew McConaughey‘s scenes were shot on the second week of filming. The chest beating and humming performed by him was improvised and actually a warm-up rite that he performs before acting. When Leonardo DiCaprio saw it while filming, the brief shot of him looking away uneasily from the camera was actually him looking at Scorsese for approval. DiCaprio encouraged them to include it in their scene and later claimed it “set the tone” for the rest of the film.

Jonah Hill wanted to eat a real goldfish because everyone was working so hard on this movie that he didn’t want to be the only person who wasn’t. He wanted everything to be real. Obviously, regulations didn’t allow it. They had a real goldfish and three goldfish handlers/wranglers on set. Hill could keep the goldfish in his mouth for three seconds at a time and then they had to put it back in water unharmed.

Margot Robbie has revealed that she accidentally slapped DiCaprio more violently than she intended to while shooting a scene: she got a little lost in the moment, slapped his face and said “F*ck you”. There was a stunned silence on the set and then all of them burst out laughing, but she feared that DiCaprio would sue her for it. She apologised, but he was impressed with her courage and asked her to hit him again.

On a routine visit, Steven Spielberg spent a day on the set, watching the shoot of the Steve Madden speech. Scorsese claims that Spielberg essentially co-directed the scene, giving advice to actors and suggesting camera angles.

This cast assembled by director Martin Scorsese’s film includes three other prominent directors in acting roles: Rob Reiner, Spike Jonze, and Jon Favreau.

 

 

 

Tuesday Blog | Anurag Kashyap’s Exploration Of Urban Lives & Its Decadence!

Anurag Kashyap

PC: Jamuura.com

 

Kashyap has a special relationship with Mumbai and especially its underbelly. Some might say he is Mumbai’s Orpheus who constantly makes a journey to those hellholes and back so that he could tell us their stories. Be it UglyThe Girl in the Yellow BootsBombay Velvet and now Raman Raghav 2.0, the city has always been Kashyap’s muse. And it is not surprising. For it was under the tutelage of his mentor Ram Gopal Varma, Kashyap wrote that famous Bombay gangster movie of all time, Satya.” – Sayantan Mondal for Jamuura.com

Anurag Kashyap is among the most revered directors in the country today with cinegoers thronging the theatres every time one of his films release. And although he began in the indie/underground space (his first film Paanch remains unreleased but very widely viewed, thanks to torrents), he has very meticulously built himself into a brand that grants his movies very successful openings at the multiplexes. As a youth icon, he echoes their views – whether radical or pragmatist and progressive – and his anti-establishment statements via his movies have won him fans. He has been open with his stories of struggle while trying to find a foothold in the industry and his personal life, making him a rare director that people love to hear talk in front of an audience, as well as from behind the camera. His recent films may not exactly have set the box office to fire, but he remains a solid inspiration for aspiring filmmakers.

Read more about Kashyap’s commentary on urban life and decadence; strong statements that he makes through his movies.

Oscar Week | His Master’s Voice | Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (1974 – present)

American actor and film producer

Leonardo DiCaprio began his career by appearing in television commercials, after which he had recurring roles in TV series, such as the soap opera Santa Barbara and the sitcom Growing Pains in the early 1990s. He was praised for his supporting role in the drama What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), and gained public recognition with leading roles in the drama The Basketball Diaries(1995) and the romantic drama Romeo + Juliet (1996), before achieving international fame with James Cameron‘s epic romance Titanic (1997), which became the highest-grossing film to that point.

DiCaprio has been a regular collaborator with Martin Scorsese since Gangs of New York (2002), and has widely been seen as Robert De Niro‘s replacement in Scorsese’s movies.

DiCaprio is a committed environmentalist, who urged his fans and all watching the 2016 Oscars ceremony to do their bit to tackle climate change.

Films of Note: This Boy’s Life (1993), What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), The Basketball Diaries (1995), Romeo + Juliet (1996), Titanic (1997), Catch Me If You Can (2002), Gangs of New York (2002), The Aviator (2004), Blood Diamond (2006), The Departed (2006), Revolutionary Road (2008), Shutter Island (2010), Inception (2010), Django Unchained (2012), The Great Gatsby (2013), The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), The Revenant (2015)